Given that transactions are implemented, this function allows you to pass in code that is run in a transaction. The default method of dbWithTransaction() calls dbBegin() before executing the code, and dbCommit() after successful completion, or dbRollback() in case of an error. The advantage is that you don't have to remember to do dbBegin() and dbCommit() or dbRollback() -- that is all taken care of. The special function dbBreak() allows an early exit with rollback, it can be called only inside dbWithTransaction().

dbWithTransaction(conn, code, ...)

dbBreak()

Arguments

conn

A DBIConnection object, as returned by dbConnect().

code

An arbitrary block of R code.

...

Other parameters passed on to methods.

Value

dbWithTransaction() returns the value of the executed code. Failure to initiate the transaction (e.g., if the connection is closed or invalid of if dbBegin() has been called already) gives an error.

Details

DBI implements dbWithTransaction(), backends should need to override this generic only if they implement specialized handling.

Specification

dbWithTransaction() initiates a transaction with dbBegin(), executes the code given in the code argument, and commits the transaction with dbCommit(). If the code raises an error, the transaction is instead aborted with dbRollback(), and the error is propagated. If the code calls dbBreak(), execution of the code stops and the transaction is silently aborted. All side effects caused by the code (such as the creation of new variables) propagate to the calling environment.

Examples

con <- dbConnect(RSQLite::SQLite(), ":memory:") dbWriteTable(con, "cash", data.frame(amount = 100)) dbWriteTable(con, "account", data.frame(amount = 2000)) # All operations are carried out as logical unit: dbWithTransaction( con, { withdrawal <- 300 dbExecute(con, "UPDATE cash SET amount = amount + ?", list(withdrawal)) dbExecute(con, "UPDATE account SET amount = amount - ?", list(withdrawal)) } )
#> [1] 1
# The code is executed as if in the curent environment: withdrawal
#> [1] 300
# The changes are committed to the database after successful execution: dbReadTable(con, "cash")
#> amount #> 1 400
dbReadTable(con, "account")
#> amount #> 1 1700
# Rolling back with dbBreak(): dbWithTransaction( con, { withdrawal <- 5000 dbExecute(con, "UPDATE cash SET amount = amount + ?", list(withdrawal)) dbExecute(con, "UPDATE account SET amount = amount - ?", list(withdrawal)) if (dbReadTable(con, "account")$amount < 0) { dbBreak() } } ) # These changes were not committed to the database: dbReadTable(con, "cash")
#> amount #> 1 400
dbReadTable(con, "account")
#> amount #> 1 1700